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Jewish Studies Program
Jewish Studies Program: San Diego State University

Last Update:
March 25, 2016

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Lectures and Events

Upcoming Events

Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges

Wednesday April 6th, 7pm in Arts and Letters, Room 101.
View directions and parking
(.pdf)

James Kirchick
Intersectionality Makes You Stupid: The Regressive Left, Israel and Third Worldism

Israel is the only democracy in the Middle East; the only country in the region that protects the rights of gay people, women and religious minorities. So why has the progressive left turned against it? Essayist and foreign correspondent James Kirchick argues that “intersectionality,” a once-esoteric concept now increasingly in vogue with activists and opinion-makers, explains not only the progressive turn against Israel, but its deeper embrace of what are in fact regressive values.

James Kirchick is a journalist and foreign correspondent currently based in Washington. He is a correspondent for The Daily Beast and writes the “Continental Drift” column on Europe for Tablet. Kirchick’s writing has appeared in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Ha’aretz, Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, Slate, The Weekly Standard, National Review and Commentary, among other publications. A former editor at the The New Republic and writer-at-large for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty based in Prague, he is a recipient of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association Journalist of the Year Award. Kirchick has been a Robert Bosch Foundation Fellow in Berlin, a Media Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and is a professional member of the PEN American Center and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a fellow with the Foreign Policy Initiative in Washington.


Monday April 11th
, 7pm in Arts and Letters, Room 101.
View directions and parking
(.pdf)

Dr. Gerald Steinberg
Soft-power warfare in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: The Politics of Human Rights and International Law

Israel is frequently accused of violating human rights and international law, and such allegations are the justifications for boycotts and "lawfare" cases in international legal frameworks. In this seminar, we will examine the history of this "soft power" warfare, the main battlegrounds, and the core actors, including non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the UN and the media. In addition, we will consider Israeli responses and potential future developments.

Dr. Gerald Steinberg is professor of Political Studies at Bar Ilan University in Israel, and president of NGO Monitor, a Jerusalem-based research institute. His research areas include Middle East diplomacy and security, the politics of human rights and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Israeli politics and arms control. Steinberg is a member of Israel Council of Foreign Affairs; contributes to the Institute for Counter-terrorism; the Mideast research group of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI); and an adviser to Israeli governmental bodies and Knesset. Recent publications include “NGOs, Human Rights, and Political Warfare in the Arab-Israel Conflict"; "The UN, the ICJ and the Separation Barrier: War by Other Means" (Israel Law Review); “Best Practices for Human Rights and Humanitarian NGO Fact-Finding” (co-author), Nijhoff, 2012; and “Filling in the Blanks: Documenting Missing Dimensions in the UN and NGO Investigations of the Gaza Conflict”, 2015. In 2013, Professor Steinberg and NGO Monitor were awarded the prestigious Menachem Begin Prize.

Monday April 25, 7pm in Arts and Letters, Room 101.
View directions and parking
(.pdf)

Analucía Lopezrevoredo and David Schraub
An Intersectional Failure: Situating Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews in Contemporary Jewish Discourse

Both within and outside of the Jewish community, discourse about Jews often omits or downplays Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews as significant subjects of analysis. The conception of the Jew is instead largely Ashke-normative—presenting the Ashkenazi experience is the de facto Jewish experience. Ashkenazi history and culture primarily structures institutional Jewish dialogue and experiential learning; it likewise dominates non-Jewish understanding of Jews and Jewish lives. Where non-Ashkenazi Jews are considered at all, they are often forcibly assimilated into foreign narratives—Mizrahi Jews are either Jews who had labored under centuries of Arab oppression before finding liberation through the establishment of Israel, or happily integrated Middle Easterners who became the "other victims of Zionism". In neither case are Mizrahi Jews respected as independent subjects of analysis, whose relationship to both Israel and the Arab world does not necessarily map onto the frames the normative (Ashkenazi) Jewish or (non-Jewish) Middle Eastern community seeks to impose. Done right, Intersectionality Theory has much to offer in rectifying this gap, promising renewed attention to the internal pluralism within groups and acknowledging the unique perspective and experience an individual with multiple minority identities can have. 

Analucía Lopezrevoredo is an ethnographer, activist, and social work educator working in academia and the Jewish non-profit world. A Sephardic Jew who's family lived in numerous places in the Diaspora, Analucía has dedicated her life to raising awareness of the Sephardic, Mizrahi, and Jew of color experience among Jewish and non-Jewish communities. Analucía holds Bachelor degrees in Political Science, Urban Studies, and Economics from Loyola Marymount University, a Master’s degree in Organizational Management and Leadership from the University of the Pacific, and is completing her Ph.D. in Social Work and Social Research at Portland State University. Her research interests include racial disparities, immigration and xenophobia, and social movements that make the needs of marginalized communities more visible. Analucia currently serves as the Program Director for JIMENA: Jews Indigenous to the Middle East and North Africa, and works as an Adjunct Instructor at Portland State University's School of Social Work. 

David Schraub is the Darling Foundation Fellow in Public Law and a Senior Research Fellow at the California Constitution Center, both at the
University of California, Berkeley Law School. His research interests are in constitutional law, contemporary issues of discrimination and inequality (with particular focus on racism and anti-Semitism), and deliberative democracy. David's scholarship has been published in, among other forums, the University of Chicago Law Review, the California Law Review, the Boston University Law Review, and Social Theory & Practice. He also blogs regularly at "The Debate Link"
(http://dsadevil.blogspot.com). David received a B.A. in political science from Carleton College, his J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School, and is currently a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of California, Berkeley.

View the event flyer (.pdf)

All lectures are at 7pm in Arts and Letters, Room 101. View directions and parking (.pdf)

 

City of the Future: Songs from the Golden Era of Yiddish Culture

Tuesday April 12th @7:00pm
Location: Smith Recital Hall

Free and Open to the Public

A concert celebrating the release of SDSU Jewish Studies Program Artist in Residence Yale Strom’s latest CD, City of the Future: Yiddish Songs from the Former Soviet Union, released on November 13, 2015. The recording is a cultural record of music written in the 1930s by Shmuel Polonski.

In 1931, Yiddish culture was thriving in the former Soviet Union. There were Yiddish schools, theatres, choirs, literature and discussion groups. Shmuel Polonski was a 29 year-old composer who wanted to spread the joy of Yiddish and the Soviet way of life through his songs, which were to be sung by youth choruses. Polonski set his original compositions to poems by such renowned Yiddish poets as Perets Markish, Izi Kharik and Itzik Fefer.

The evening will feature the following artists:

Singers: Michael Alpert - Scotland, Judy Bressler - Boston , Anthony Russell - Oakland , and Elizabeth Schwartz - San Diego

Musicians: Norbert Stachel - reeds (NYC), Peter Stan - accordion (NYC), Jeff Pekarek - bass, Fred Benedetti - guitar, Duncan Moore - percussion, and Yale Strom - violin

View the event flyer (.pdf)


Past Events

Reading the Bible in Exile: A Prophet's Take on the Exodus from Egypt

March 23, 2016
10:30 am

Coronado Public Library
640 Orange Avenue, Coronado, CA 92118

Lecturer: Professor Risa Levitt Kohn, SDSU

Ezekiel is the first biblical prophet since Moses to see visions of God outside of Israel. The prophet and his contemporaries, by virtue of their dislocation from Israel, had to rethink tradition in order to remap their newly formed communities. We will explore the creative way in which the prophet casts his current audience as the exodus generation. The wandering and rebellion did not end for Ezekiel, as they do in Torah, upon entry into the land. The current exile does not simply recall the travails of the exodus from Egypt; instead, it is an extension of that initial event.

 

Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges

All lectures are at 7pm in Arts and Letters, Room 101. View directions and parking (.pdf)

Tuesday March 22nd, 7pm in Arts and Letters, Room 101.

Dr. Chanan Naveh
Israel's Soft Power: Public Diplomacy in Action

This lecture will focus on Israel’s struggles in the arena of Public Diplomacy, particularly its challenge to persuade others that its society has many facets beyond those of war and occupation. Yet, despite a narrative underscoring its democracy, quality of life for all its citizens, support for disaster zones all over the globe, significant achievements in High-Tech and modern agriculture and even cultural exports such as TV programming, it appears that public perception in many countries has not followed suit. We will review examples of Israel’s efforts to explore the ideas of Soft Power and Public Diplomacy

Dr. Chanan Naveh is a senior lecturer in the School of Communications, Sapir College, (Israel) and was the Chair of the School in the years 2010 – 2014. For 15 years he was a lecturer at the International Relations Department, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and at the Political Science Department at Tel Aviv University. From 1969-2004 he worked for Kol Israel (Israeli Radio), news division in various positions including Editor-in-Chief and managing editor. Dr. Naveh specializes in research of the Internet and international relations, international media, media and foreign affairs, the radio in Israel and practicing these topics in international simulations. The University of Michigan Press published his latest book, World Politics Simulations in a Global Information Age, in 2015. His recent publications include: "Crisis Press Coverage in the Arab-Israel & East-West Conflicts", Media, War & Conflict (2013); "Israeli Radio during the Six-Day War", The Journal of Israeli History (2009); The Web as an Israeli Solidarity Environment during The second Lebanon War (2008) and Pirate Radio in Israel (2007), awarded the distinguished grant of the Second Authority for Radio and Television (Israel).

 

Book Reading

Visiting Israeli Author, Assaf Gavron, reads from his award-winning novel, The Hilltop.

Wednesday, March 9th at 7 p.m. in Love Library, Room 430.

A chill settled on the hilltop during the course of the night and sparkled when morning broke in millions of refractions of frost from among clods of earth, gardening tools, cacti, upturned push cars, and on the windshields of vehicles. The day opened its eyes with a wide yawn, and hours would go by before it would shake off the cold.
–From, The Hilltop

Event cosponsored with the MFA Program in Creative Writing@ SDSU as part of their Living Writers Series

 

Inaugural Lecture of the Rebecca E. Moore Lecture in Religious Studies

Jewish Scholars and the New Testament: Re-Evaluating the Sources for Christian Origins

Thursday March 3rd, 3:00 PM
Location: Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center, SDSU

Rebecca Moore is Emerita Professor of Religious Studies at San Diego State University. An expert in the history of Christianity, in 2015 she published Women in Christian Traditions, a feminist analysis of the role women have played in the development of Christianity (New York University Press). She authored Voices of Christianity: A Global Introduction (McGraw Hill 2006) as well. Dr. Moore also studies New Religious Movements, where she has concentrated on interpreting Peoples Temple and the events at Jonestown, Guyana that occurred in November 1978. This work can be seen on the website http://jonestown.sdsu.edu and in the book Understanding Jonestown and Peoples Temple (Praeger 2009). She is currently the Reviews Editor for Nova Religio: The Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Religious Studies

 

A Water Crisis is Coming… What Can We Do to Avoid It?

A LECTURE BY SETH M. SIEGEL, Author of LET THERE BE WATER: Israel's Solution for a Water-Starved World

Wednesday, December 9, 3:30 P.M.
Physics 148

This event is free and open to the public

Despite scant natural water resources (roughly 60% desert), a rapidly growing population and economy, and often-hostile neighbors, Israel has consistently jumped ahead of the water innovation-curve to assure a dynamic, vital future for itself. How did Israel transform itself from a parched land into a water superpower and how might this model inform the United States and countries everywhere by showing how to blunt the worst of the coming water calamities? Join us for a lecture on water conservation, cooperation, and hope for a more stable future.

Presented by the Jewish Studies Program, Department of Geography, Watershed Science Institute and Blue Gold Initiative

View the event flyer (.pdf)

 

Somalia Quartet

Creative Catalyst Grantee Yale Strom presents the world premiere of his Somalia Quartet.

Oct. 6, at 7:30 pm at the San Diego Repertory Theatre.

Strom's idea was to take Somalian folk music and weave it with western classical motifs. He hopes this piece welcomes and introduces the Somalian community to San Diego. The premiere will be performed by the outstanding Hausmann Quartet. They will open the concert with a composition by the Hungarian composer Bela Bartok "Quartet No. 2."

Location: (Downtown) 79 Horton Plaza, San Diego, CA 92101.

Admission: FREE

 

Tango Nuevo

October 20, 2015 at 7pm
Smith Recital Hall Music Bldg.

An evening filled with Tango music that explores the unique connection between Jewish composers and musicians from Poland and the way that they integrated tango music into their own repertoire.

Featuring the unique sounds of Camarada, a collection of five exceptionally trained and gifted instrumentalists:

  • Lou Fanucchi, accordion
  • Fred Benedetti, guitar
  • Jeff Pekarek, double bass
  • Elizabeth Schwartz - vocals

Inspired by the music of Astor Piazzolla, who introduced this form of music and dance by incorporating jazz and classical music with traditional Argentinean Tango music; Camarada's Tango Nuevo promises to be an inspiring evening of music.

New addition to the program just announced! Live Tango dancing Featuring award-winning Tango dancers Irina Bell Chalkevitch and Derek Bell.

Free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Doors open at 6:45 pm.

 

Jews and Latinos! Jewish Music and Hot Latin Rhythms

Jews and Latinos! Jewish Music and Latin RhythmsApril 22 @ 7pm
Location: Smith Recital Hall - SDSU

The concert will explore how Jewish and Latino musicians worked together in the 1950's through 1960's popularizing Latin dance rhythms to new audiences especially Jewish audiences in South Florida. One way was to take Jewish songs or melodies and add the Afro-Cuban rhythms.

The show will feature Stephanie Richards - trumpet, Dan Reagan - trombone, Irving Flores - piano, Gene Perry - Afro-Cuban percussion, Duncan Moore - drums, Jeff Pekarek - bass, Fred Benedetti - guitar, Lou Fanucchi - accordion, Elizabeth Schwartz - vocals, Tripp Sprague - saxophone/flute and Yale Strom - violin.

Free and open the public

 


Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges Lecture Series

Our tradition at San Diego State University's Jewish Studies Program is to bring to our community the most up to date research on Israel, the Middle East and related topics of interest.

This year, in partnership with Hillel of San Diego at SDSU, we are pleased to present to the San Diego community a three-part lecture series.

All lectures are free to the public.  

Israel's international Legal Challenges: What Lies Ahead?

Dr. Eugene Kontorovich
Professor of Law, Northwestern University, School of Law

Thursday April 16, 2015 at 7:00pm

Prof. Eugene Kontorovich's teaches at Northwestern University School of Law, and a is a Senior Fellow at the Kohelet Policy Forum in Jerusalem.

He specializes in constitutional and international law. He is one of the world's preeminent experts on international law and the Israel-Arab conflict. He is regularly called on to advise legislators and cabinet members in the U.S., Israel, and Europe on questions pertaining to Israel and international law. He has served as a consultant for the U.S. Defense Department, wrote a Supreme Court amicus brief in the Jerusalem passport case, and his scholarship has been cited in leading international law cases in the U.S. and abroad. Prof. Kontorovich "has emerged as a one-man legal lawfare brain trust for the Jewish state," according to a recent essay in Haaretz.

Kontorovich regularly briefs visiting European and American legislators and celebrities on their trips to Israel, as well as speaking to hundreds of universities, synagogues, Jewish and professional groups in the U.S. and Europe. His scholarship has been published in leading academic journals and his expertise is often sought out and quoted by major news organizations such as The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, NPR News, Associated Press, LA Times, and numerous television and radio programs. 

Prof. Kontorovich's writings on Israel have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Jerusalem Post, and numerous other publications, and he is a contributor to the Washington Post's Volokh Conspiracy legal blog. 

He has been honored with a fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, in 2011-12, and with the Federalist Society's prestigious Bator Award, given annually to a young scholar (under 40), for outstanding scholarship and teaching.

He attended the University of Chicago for college and law school, and ultimately taught there. After law school, he clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

Israeli Arabs in Israel's Policy-Making

Dr. Mohammed Wattad
Assistant Professor, Zefat College, School of Law

Wednesday March 18, 2015 at 7:00pm

Dr. Mohammed Wattad is 2014-2015 Schusterman Visiting Israel Professor at the University of California, Irvine.

He is a legal scholar specializing in international and comparative criminal law, comparative constitutional law, international law and legal issues surrounding war, torture and terrorism. A graduate of University of Haifa School of Law, Dr. Wattad holds a Masters of Law degree from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He holds another Masters of Law degree from Columbia University, where he earned as well his Juris Doctorate, as a Fulbright Scholar.

Dr. Wattad completed post doctorate work as a Halbert Fellow of the Munk Center at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, where he was also a visiting scholar, and served as a Minerva Fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Germany. He is currently an assistant professor at Zefat College's School of Law in Israel and editor-in-chief of the International Journal Medicine and Law.

Dr. Wattad has expertise in the history of Israel and issues of self-image and identity in multi-cultural societies. He has written and spoken extensively on societal challenges confronting the Middle East and Israel, including relations between Israel's Jewish and Arab citizens and Israel's external relations with surrounding Arab states.

He served as a legal clerk at the Supreme Court of Israel under the supervision of Justice Dalia Dorner and was a member of the Legal Task Force of Scholars for Peace in the Middle East.

Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges

A Town Hall with The Honorable David Siegel Consul General of Israel, Los Angeles

Tuesday March 10, 2015 at 7:00p.m.

David Siegel assumed the post of Consul General of Israel in Los Angeles in August 2011, where he serves as the senior representative of the State of Israel to the Southwestern United States.

Consul General Siegel most recently served as Chief of Staff to Israel's Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs. In this role, he was involved in policy formulation and decision-making at the highest echelons of Israel's foreign policy establishment.

Mr. Siegel also served two terms at the Embassy of Israel in senior posts and where he was the voice of Israel to the Washington press corps.

An expert on North American affairs, Consul General Siegel graduated from the University of Vermont with a B.A. in Political Science and earned a Master's Degree in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in Boston. He served as a Commander in the Israel Defense Forces.

Seeking Justice: Strengthening the Prospects for Middle East Peace

Dr. David Makovsky
Ziegler Distinguished Fellow, Washington Institute Director, Project on Middle East Peace Process

Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at 7:00p.m

Between November 2013 and September 2014, David Makovsky advised Secretary of State John Kerry as part of an elite team charged with seeking an historic peace agreement between Israelis and Palestinians. Makovsky's firsthand account of what it's like to work behind the scenes on the most difficult diplomatic issues of the last century provides a riveting view of the issues, the personalities, and the prospects for peace moving forward.

David Makovsky is the Ziegler Distinguished Fellow at The Washington Institute and Director of the Project on the Middle East Peace Process. He is also an Adjunct Professor in Middle East Studies at Johns Hopkins University's Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and recently concluded an almost ten-month stint as a senior advisor on Secretary of State John Kerry's peace team.

Author of numerous Washington Institute monographs and essays on issues related to the Middle East Peace Process and the Arab-Israeli conflict, he is also co-author, with Dennis Ross, of the 2009 Washington Post bestseller Myths, Illusions, and Peace: Finding a New Direction for America in the Middle East (Viking/Penguin).

 

25th Annual San Diego Jewish Film Festival presents Yale Strom's newest film Letter To Wedgwood: The Life Of Gabriella Hartstein Auspitz

Tuesday, February 10, 2015
2pm

Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center, Jacobs Family Campus
David & Dorothea Garfield Theatre
4126 Executive Drive, La Jolla, California 92037
www.lfjcc.org

In 1922 Mukaevo, Czechoslovakia, young Gabriella Hartstein presents a bouquet to Colonel Josiah Wedgwood, a British Christian visiting to support the Zionist cause. When fascists capture Mukaevo years later, the now-grown Gabriella frantically begs Wedgewood, now a Member of Parliament, for help. Will Wedgwood become her personal Righteous Gentile by helping Gabriella and her brother escape? Employing interviews, visual archives, and personal letters, San Diego director Yale Strom has dramatically documented this unusual aspect of Holocaust history.

Purchase Tickets (use promo code: SDSU to receive a discount)

 

Excavating the Holy City: New Archaeological Discoveries in Jerusalem

Tuesday, November 18
3:00 pm
Scripps Cottage

With Dr. Doron Ben Ami

Israel Antiquities Authority & Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem

Senior Archaeologist of the Givati Parking Lot Excavation in the City of David is the largest, most comprehensive excavation in Jerusalem today

Free & Open to the Public

Read the SDSU NewsCenter Story

 

Film Screening at UCSD

Join us at the UCSD campus for of a film by their viitng Israeli prof Rami Kimchi with comments by our visiting prof Sariel Birnbaum.

"The Night of Fools" Film Screening

The story of Algerian Jewry's Anti-Nazi Resistance, which on November 8th, 1942, succeeded (with only 400 young men) in taking control of the capital city of Algiers, where there were about 25,000 French pro-Nazi soldiers. They kept control for one night and handed over the city to the Americans, who landed on the city's shores the next morning. This is a very Jewish story of coping with a threat of annihilation, which demonstrates the qualities of Daring, Anarchism, Chutzpah, Cunning, Creativity and Faith.

Thursday, December 4th, 2014
5:00 pm

 

Peter Cole, Acclaimed Poet & Translator, MacArthur "Genius" Award Recipient,  Reading from his new book The Invention of Influence

Wednesday, October 29th at 7 p.m. in Love Library, Room 430. 

JSP Co-Sponsored Event with the Hugh C. Hyde Living Writer Series

 Free & Open to the Public

“Peter Cole is a true maker. His extraordinary learning is deep and personal, and his poems, like his translations, are powered by a large spiritual quest to link and light the world with words. He stands with amazement before great mysteries.” —Edward Hirsch

The recipient of a 2007 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Peter Cole has published four books of poetry, Rift (Station Hill, 1999); Hymns & Qualms (Sheep Meadow Press, 1998); Things on Which I've Stumbled (New Directions, 2008); and The Invention of Influence (2014). A fifth volume, What Is Doubled: Poems 1981-1989, was published by Shearsman Books in the UK. “Prosodic mastery fuses with a keen moral intelligence [in Cole’s work]," wrote the American Poet. Other reviewers have noted the “politically charged and often dazzling” nature of the verse, as well as the “quiet, streaming power in [his] work that leads the reader back to it over and over again.” Cole’s vision of connectedness, his wit, and his grounded wisdom, along with his expansive sense of literature’s place in a meaningful life, render his poems at once fresh and abiding. His prize-winning translations of the Hebrew Golden Age poets have helped to recreate for contemporary American readers the multifaceted world of medieval Spain, in which Jewish artistic and intellectual communities flourished under Islamic rule. His anthology The Dream of the Poem (Princeton, 2007)—recipient of the National Jewish Book Award and winner of the American Publishers Association’s Award for Book of the Year—traces the arc of the entire period and reveals this remarkable poetic world in all of its richness, humor, grace, gravity, and wisdom. By far the most potent and comprehensive gathering of medieval Hebrew poems ever assembled in English, Cole’s anthology builds on what poet and translator Richard Howard has described as “the finest labor of poetic translation that I have seen in many years” and “an entire revelation: a body of lyric and didactic verse so intense, so intelligent, and so vivid that it appears to identify a whole dimension of historical consciousness previously unavailable to us.” 

About THE INVENTION OF INFLUENCE (Poetry, 2014)
“Masterful…. Deeply allusive, profound, committed verse.” —Booklist
Peter Cole has been called "an inspired writer" (The Nation) and “one of the handful of authentic poets of his own American generation” (Harold Bloom). In this, his fourth book of poems, he presents a ramifying vision of human linkage. At the heart of the collection stands the stunning title poem, which brings us into the world of Victor Tausk, a maverick and tragic early disciple of Freud who wrote about one of his patients’ mental inventions — an "influence machine" that controlled his thoughts. In Cole’s symphonic poem, this machine becomes a haunting image for the ways in which tradition and the language of others shape so much of what we think and say. The shorter poems in this rich and surprising volume treat the dynamics of coupling, the curiously varied nature of perfection, the delights of the senses, the perils of poetic vocation, and more.

 

FREE SCHOLAR LECTURES ON JEWISH STUDIES ANNOUNCED

The San Diego Center for Jewish Culture’s Scholar Lectures on Jewish Studies, in Carlsbad, begins its season of free lectures with visiting Israeli scholar, Dr. Sariel Birnbaum who will speak on “The Image of the Jew in Arab Cinema”.

His talk will takes place in the Schulman Auditorium of the Carlsbad Dove Library on Monday, October 20 at 7:00 pm.

How does the Arab cinema portray Jews? Jews are depicted in many films from the 1950’s and 1960’s according to anti-Semitic stereotypes, while in the 1990’s and 2000’s anti-Semitism was relegated to the margins. Are anti-Semitic motives in Arab cinema based on ancient Islamic traditions, or imported from Europe? Dr. Birnbaum will also discuss films concerning the early days of Islam and the place of Jews within them.

For more information on this or future talks in the series, contact the San Diego Center for Jewish Culture at 858-362-1327 or www.sdcjc.org/carlsbad.

The same lecture will also be taught on Wed Oct 22 at 10:30 am at the Winn room of the Coronado Public Library

 

SDSU Jewish Studies Program presents Common Chords V

Thursday October 23rd
Smith Recital Hall
7pm

Featuring:

JSP Artist in Residence Yale Strom

Persian pop star Hamed Nikpay

Indian tabla player Samir Chatterjee

Percussionist Sunny Jain, recognized as a leading voice in the emerging South Asian-American jazz movement

These stellar musicians will be performing in concert with Hot Pstromi: Elizabeth Schwartz (vocals), Mark Dresser (Bassist), Tripp Sprague (reeds) and Lou Fanucchi (accordion).

The Common Chords ensemble is comprised of Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Jain and Christian musicians.

Yale Strom



Sunny Jain

Samir Chatterjee

In addition to the concert, there will be an opening program performed by the Tifereth Israel Community Orchestra, poetry readings from different cultures and faiths by students and faculty and the premiere of a new dance piece choreographed by John Malashock to an original composition which Yale composed for this purpose. The Common Chords concert will conclude the evening.

This event is part of the JSPs Initiative for Moral Courage and will be a featured concert for the Daniel Pearl World Music Days, with Ruth and Judea Pearl (Daniel's parents) in attendance to introduce the ensemble.

This event is free and open to the public.

For more information regarding parking costs and directions to the event, please view the parking directions.

 

 

Jews & Jazz

Jews and Jazz: featuring Norbert Stachel with Yale Strom & Hot Pstromi

March 5th, 7:00pm
Smith Recital Hall

Join us to celebrate the sounds of the 1920s to 50s, when jazz and klezmer happily intermarried. Jewish musicians learned to speak "jive", while African American musicians dug the music as much as they dug the Jewish deli cuisine after their gigs! Tunes and songs from Cab Calloway to Dave Tarras will be presented with a tasty dose of improvisation on the side. Hot Pstromi includes the world renowned artists Duncan Moore(percussion), Lou Fanucchi (accordion), Jeff Pekarek (bass), Elizabeth Schwartz (vocals), Gilbert Castellanos (trumpet), Tripp Sprague (tenor),Yale Strom (violin), Fred Benedetti (guitar) and special guest from NYC Norbert Stachel (baritone, clarinet, flute).

Norbert Stachel, a saxophonist and multi woodwind instrumentalist, is widely recognized for being a unique soloist and also for his strong ensemble contributions in all kinds of musical genres. Norbert has recorded, toured, and performed with a variety of known and established names, as well as artists deserving wider recognition. He has worked with famous names including: Aerosmith, Tower of Power, Roger Waters, Tony Toni Toné, Ted Nugent, Eddie Money, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, Prince, Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Dream Theatre, Diana Ross, Boz Scaggs, Bonnie Raitt, Cold Blood, Neil Diamond, En Vogue, The Temptations, The Four Tops, Sheila E, Quincy Jones, D’Angelo, Billy Joel, Jimmy Buffet, Quicksilver, Les McCann, Don Cherry, Freddie Hubbard, Roy Hargrove, Andrew Hill, Charlie Haden, Benny Green, Russel Malone, Woody Herman, Kenny Burrell, Buddy Montgomery, Joe Henderson, Eddie Henderson, George Cables, Bobby Hutcherson, Lou Rawls, Eartha Kitt, Dizzy Gillespie, Zigaboo Modeliste, Flora Purim & Airto, Merle Saunders, Bob Weir, Hiram Bullock, Carlos Santana, & countless others.

Norbert is accomplished on all saxophones, clarinets, flutes, and ethnic wind instruments. Norbert has 30+ years experience playing Jazz, Classical, Rock, R&B, Afro Cuban/Latin, Salsa, Klezmer, Middle Eastern, World, and most other forms of music. Norbert also composes instrumental & vocal music, and also arranges for any kind of instrumental ensemble or choir.

 

Secret Histories of Unknown Judaisms

With Professor Yossi Chajes
In partnership with Ohr Shalom Synagogue 

March 7th-9th 2014

 

COMMON CHORDS IV

This special event features Pakistani rock star Salman Ahmad of the band Junoon, South Asia's most popular rock band, internationally renowned Indian tabla player Samir Chatterjee, and percussionist Sunny Jain, recognized as a leading voice in the emerging South Asian-American jazz movement. These three stellar musicians will be performing in concert with acclaimed klezmer ethnographer and SDSU Jewish Studies Artist-in-Residence Yale Strom and members of his band Hot Pstromi: Elizabeth Schwartz (vocals), Mark Dresser (Bassist), Tripp Sprague (reeds) and Lou Fanucchi (accordion).

Common Chords, presented on Thursday October 3 at 7pm in Smith Recital Hall in the Music Building celebrates the common roots of Muslim and Jewish music. As a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations, one of Salman Ahmad’s main goals is to foster mutual respect and understanding between Muslims and Jews by bringing these two groups of people together in concert settings.

Read the SDSU NewsCenter article

THIS CONCERT IS SPONSORED BY SDSU'S JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AND THE RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT AS PART OF THE DANIEL PEARL FOUNDATION'S WORLD MUSIC DAY

 

SDSU JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM in partnership with SAN DIEGO JEWISH ACADEMY with support from The Consulate General of Israel in Los Angeles and The Jewish Federation of San Diego County PRESENT:

An Evening with award-winning Israeli author & filmmaker  ETGAR KERET 


Monday September 30th at 7pm

Reading & Discussion with Etgar Keret, SDSU students & community members

Monday September 30th, @11:00am

Hailed as the voice of young Israel and one of its most innovative and  extraordinary writers, Etgar Keret is internationally acclaimed for his  short stories.

Born in Tel Aviv in 1967 to an extremely diverse family,  his brother heads an Israeli group that lobbies for the legalization of  marijuana, and his sister is an orthodox Jew and the mother of ten  children. Keret regards his family as a microcosm of Israel. His book, The Nimrod Flip-Out,(Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2006), is a collection of 32 short  stories that captures the craziness of life in Israel today.

Rarely extending beyond three or four pages, these stories fuse the banal with  the surreal. Shot through with a dark, tragicomic sensibility and  casual, comic-strip violence, he offers a window on a surreal world that  is at once funny and sad.
 
His books are bestsellers in Israel and have been published in twenty-two languages. Books include Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God (2004, St. Martin's Press); Missing Kissinger (2007, Chatto & Windus); and Gaza Blues (2004). In France, Kneller`s Happy Campers is listed as one of the Fnac`s two-hundred books of the decade, and The Nimrod Flip-Out was published in Francis Ford Coppola`s magazine, Zoetrope (2004).

His most recent book Suddenly a Knock on the Door (2010),  became an instant #1 bestseller in Israel. Keret has received the Book Publishers Association`s  Platinum Prize several times, the Chevalier medallion of France's Order of Arts and Letters and has been awarded the Prime Minister`s Prize, and the Ministry of  Culture`s Cinema Prize in Israel.

As a filmmaker, Keret is the writer of several feature screenplays, including Skin Deep (1996), which won First Prize at several international film festivals and was awarded the Israeli Oscar. Wrist Cutters, featuring Tom Waits, was released in August 2007. Jellyfish, his first movie as a director along with his wife Shira Geffen, won the  coveted Camera d'Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2007.

 

2012-2013 Mandelbaum Family Lecture Series

“The History of Israel in 10 Objects”
Professor Risa Levitt Kohn

Inspired by “A History of the World in 100 Objects,” the British Museum’s BBC radio series and book—get up close and personal with artifacts from pottery to weapons, amulets and jewelry, each of which gives us an intimate glimpse into the world of ancient Israel and beyond. The history of civilization is one of invention and innovation.  We continually create new items to use, to admire, or to leave our mark on the world. Behind every object is a story—from the hands of the person that fashioned it, to the ideas that shaped the world in which the object was made.  We will explore 10 quintessential objects that embody the narrative of Israel.

Monday March 11th, 7pm
Carlsbad Dove Library

Wednesday March 13, 10:30 am
Coronado Public Library

 

The Series@Beth Israel Presents: And God Said What? Why Biblical Scholarship is Not Sunday School, with Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn

Monday, March 18, 2013, 7:00pm

To the ancient Israelites the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible were not merely literal chronicles of events, but served other purposes – folkloric, political, heroic, poetic and religious. This lecture samples the varieties of biblical literature, situating the meanings of these texts among their original audiences, and explores the methods and concerns of contemporary biblical studies.

 

Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges

Four Mondays in April at Congregation Beth Israel

Monday, April 08, 2013, 7:00pm

The Threat to Israel’s Existence – Why It’s Back, How to Deal with It, with Daniel Pipes, Director Middle East Forum

Monday, April 15, 2013, 7:00pm

Nationalism, Ethnicity and Tradition: Jewish-Israeli Secularism and Its Limits with Dr. Yaacov Yadgar, Lisa & Douglas Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor, UC Berkeley

Tuesday, April 23rd, 7:00p.m. -- Please note new date

Between East and West: Middle Eastern Jews and the Arab-Israeli Conflict with Dr. Moshe Naor, Leichtag Meyerhoff Visiting Israeli Professor at San Diego State University 2012/13

Monday, April 29th, 7:00pm

The Power of Orthodoxy in Israel and Its Implication on Women's Rights with Dr. Anat Maor, Schusterman Visiting Israeli Professor, UC Irvine


An Evening with Author Meir Shalev

Bestselling Israeli Novelist, Writer and Columnist for Yediot Ahronot

In Partnership with
Congregation Ohr Shalom

"Between Antiquity and Modernity: Can the Hebrew Language
Survive its Revival?"


Friday April 12, 2013 at  5:30pm
At Congregation Ohr Shalom

 

Rachel Barton Pine: Virtuoso Violinist presents: L'Dor V'Dor: Jewish Classical Music from the 19th Century to the 21st

May 2, 2013
7pm
SDSU, Rhapsody Hall

Before the Jewish Emancipation, virtually all Jewish music in Europe was sacred music (with the exception of performances by klezmorim during weddings and other functional occasions). Though the Jews' musical tradition is far older than anyone else's in Europe, there was a notable dearth of Jewish influence on European classical music until the 19th century. While music remained an integral aspect of Jewish religious services, Jewish musicians, except as converts, played a small role in European musical development. This all changed in the nineteenth century, when many Jewish composers and performers began to cross over to the classical music world, changing it forever. Virtuoso violinist Rachel Barton Pine will present a program of Jewish classical music ranging from Bloch's "Baal Shem Suite" to Achron's "Hebrew Melody." She will also premiere Yale Strom's suite for solo violin "Bessarabia."

 

2012-2013 Mandelbaum Family Lecture Series

"War and Solidarity in Israel, 1948-1967"
Dr. Moshe Naor
Leichtag Meyerhoff, Visiting Israeli Professor, SDSU

Wednesday, February 6, 2013, 10:30 am
Coronado Public Library

Monday February 4th, 7pm
Carlsbad Dove Library

 

Sunday, February 3, at 2 P.M.
Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn
"And God Said What?: Why Biblical Scholarship is Not Sunday School"

To the ancient Israelites the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible were not merely literal chronicles of events, but served other purposes—folkloric, political, heroic, poetic, religious.  This lecture samples the varieties of biblical literature, situating the meanings of these texts among their original audiences and explores the methods and concerns of contemporary biblical studies.  

Temple Adat Shalom
15905 Pomerado Road
Poway, CA 92064 

Free and open to the public

 

The Second Symposium on Moral Courage

"Survival in Sarajevo: Jews, Muslims and Christians Working Together During the Bosnian War"

October 14th-17th, 2012 at San Diego State University

 

Israel and the Arab Spring

Sunday, Oct. 21, 2pm

At Temple Adat Shalom

TAS Adult Education presents Prof. Moshe Naor, Leichtag Meyerhof Visiting Israeli Scholar, Jewish Studies Program, SDSU.
Dr. Noar will discuss the Arab Spring and examine how the Arab Spring is perceived in Israel.

 

Communicating Awe: Media Memory and Holocaust Commemoration

Please join students and faculty for a talk by Dr. Oren Meyers (Department of Communication, University of Haifa; Lipinsky and Schusterman visiting Prof., Jewish Studies Program, San Diego State University), titled "Communicating Awe: Media Memory and Holocaust Commemoration."

This talk is part of SDSU's School of Communication colloquium series,and takes place on February 8th, 2012 from 2-3pm in COMM 209.

 

Revolution, Repression and Reconciliation: The Arab Awakening and the Prospects for Peace

Ambassador Daniel C. Kurtzer

Thursday, March 22 at 3:15 PM North Education 60

Co-Sponsored by the Departments of Political Science, Religious Studies, ISCOR, Center for Islamic & Arabic Studies and The Fred J. Hansen Institute for World Peace

 

Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges Three Master Lectures March 15; March 22; March 27, 2012

All lectures are free and open to the public and will be held at:

Temple Solel

Israel's Ultra-Orthodox: A Rising Power?

Dr. Nahshon Perez
Thursday, March 15th 7:00p.m.

Dr. Nahshon Perezis Visiting Professor at the Elie Wiesel Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University. He has held fellowships at UCLA, the University of Montreal and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium where he was a Hoover fellow. Perez earned his PhD at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research includes articles dealing with topics such as preferential treatment in the Israeli society granted to veterans of national service and the Israeli Defense Force and the debate surrounding the Law of Return.

Revolution, Repression and Reconciliation: The Arab Awakening and the Prospects for Peace

Dr. Daniel C. Kurtzer
Thursday March 22 7:00p.m.

Dr. Daniel C. Kurtzer is S. Daniel Abraham Visiting Professor of Middle East Policy Studies at Princeton University. During a 29-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, he served as the US Ambassador to Israel and to Egypt. Kurtzer has held a number of senior policy and diplomatic positions, including political officer at the American embassies in Cairo and Tel Aviv, speechwriter for Secretary of State George P. Shultz, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern Affairs, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Research. He was instrumental in formulating and executing American policy in the Middle East peace process. Kurtzer received a B.A. from Yeshiva University and a Ph.D. in comparative politics from Columbia University and has received distinguished service awards from the President, the Secretary of State and the United States Intelligence Community.

A Nation in Uniform? Civil-Military Relations in Israel

Dr. Oren Meyers
Tuesday March 27 7:00p.m.
Temple Solel

Dr. Oren Meyers is the Lipinsky Schusterman Visitng Israeli Scholar at San Diego State University and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Communication, at the University of Haifa. Dr. Meyers's reserach interests focus on Israeli collective memory, popular culture and Israeli journalism. Dr. Meyers' recent publications include "Memory in Journalism and the Memory of Journalism: Israeli Journalists and the Constructed Legacy of Haolam Hazeh," Journal of Communication, 2007; "The Engine's in the Front, But its Heart's in the Same Place: Advertising, Nostalgia and the Construction of Commodities as Realms of Memory," The Journal of Popular Culture, 2009; "Prime Time Commemoration: An Analysis of Television Broadcasts on Israel's Memorial Day for the Holocaust and the Heroism," Journal of Communication, 2009 (with Eyal Zandberg & Motti Neiger). His appointment at SDSU is made possible by generous grants from the Lipinsky Visiting Israeli Fund and the Israel Scholars Fund from the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise.

 

WORDS OF A PEOPLE: YIDDISH, SPOKEN AND SUNG

On April 3rd at 7pm in SDSU's Rhapsody Hall (Music Bldg.), the Jewish Studies Program under the guidance of artist-in-residence Yale Strom will present WORDS OF A PEOPLE: YIDDISH, SPOKEN AND SUNG.

This program will feature world renowned poet Jerome Rothenberg (UCSD) reciting his poems in both Yiddish and in English. Rothenberg's poems have been translated into many languages and appear in many major poetry anthologies throughout the world.

This will be followed by the San Diego premiere of Yale Strom's sextet "THE WARSAW GHETTO UPRISING", which commemorates the April 19th 1943 Jewish resistance. Led by Mordecai Anelewicz, Jews within the Warsaw Ghetto in German-occupied Poland rose up during World War II. These brave fighters opposed Nazi deportation of the remaining ghetto population to the Treblinka extermination camp. The most significant portion of the rebellion took place from April 19 until May 16, 1943, and ended when the poorly armed and supplied resistance was crushed by German troops. This performance will commemorate the 69th anniversary of the largest single revolt by the Jews during the Holocaust. Strom's sextet will include his original Yiddish lyrics and will be performed by Issac Allen (violin), Yuan Zhang (cello), Jeff Pekarek (bass), Richard Tibbits (flute),elickman (clarinet) and Elizabeth Schwartz (vocals).

Jerome Rothenberg is an internationally known poet with over eighty books of poetry and several assemblages of traditional and avant-garde poetry such as Technicians of the Sacred, Poems for the Millennium, and A Big Jewish Book. He has performed his poetry internationally, accompanied by musicians such as Bertram Turetzky, Charlie Morrow, Pauline Oliveros, George Lewis, and Frank London & the Klezmatics.

Richard Tibbitts is a native of San Diego who began his musical training on piano, and then switched to flute, studying under Frederick Baker of the SD Symphony. He received his bachelor's degree in music performance from Cal-State Fullerton, and his master's degree from the University of Michigan. The following year he was the recipient of an exchange scholarship between Michigan and the University of Tübingen, Germany.ever since.

Robert Zelickman, clarinetist, is a Lecturer of Music at UC San Diego where he has taught since 1983.In addition to teaching clarinet and performing contemporary music, Robert conducts the UCSD Wind Ensemble. He is a member of Orchestra Nova San Diego and has performed with the San Diego Symphony and the San Diego Opera. Robert is also well known throughout California as the co-director of the Second Avenue Klezmer Ensemble. Zelickman earned his BA at UCLA and a MFA at Cal Arts. Isaac Allen, Violin -Isaac Allen is a prize-winner in the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition and the Las Cruces Symphony Guild's Young Artist Competition. As a member of the Euruke Chamber Players, Isaac has performed regularly on the stages of Alice Tully and Merkin concert halls at Lincoln Center, New York and in Washington D.C. Currently he is a member of the The Hausmann Quartet. They are the resident string quartet at SDSU (2010-2012) During 2010-2012 the Hausmann quartet will have a concurrent affiliation sponsored by the La Jolla Music Society.

Yuan Zhang, Cello - Yuan Zhang began to study music at the age of three and the cello at four at the Hebei Performing Arts Academy in China. After winning the first prize in the second Chinese National Cello Competition, he was invited to study at the Chinese Music Conservatory in Beijing at the age of twelve. Currently he is a member of the Hausmann String Quartet

Jeff Pekarek was the youngest contracted member of the San Diego Symphony when he joined the contrabass section at age seventeen. He performed with the orchestra from 1975-79, and during the summer pops concerts backed up such luminaries as Benny Goodman, Sarah Vaughan, and Sergio Mendez. He is the principal arranger for filmmaker and composer Yale Strom. This collaboration has included many audio recordings, several documentary films, two ballets, a string quartet, and the orchestral work 'Aliyot', first performed by the St. Louis Symphony. His lengthy discography includes albums by The Peter Pupping Quartet (Peter Pupping Band), The Electrocarpathians, Keltik Kharma, and Kick Up The Dust.

Elizabeth Schwartz has become celebrated for her uniquely dusky timbre. Her soulful interpretations have drawn numerous comparisons to both Edith Piaf and Romanian singer Maria Tanase. New York City's landmark Eldridge Street Synagogue created its first women-only event in order for Schwartz to sing there. She performs regularly across North America and Central, Eastern and Northern Europe in venues ranging from jazz clubs to synagogues to concert halls, and is proud to have concertized in the two largest synagogues in the world (Budapest and Strasbourg). Noted collaborators include Yale Strom , Alicia Svigals, Mark Dresser, Marty Ehrlich, Salman Ahmad, Samir Chatterjee, Hungarian supergroup Muzsikas, Tsimble maestro Kalman Balogh, Romanian panflutist Damian Draghici, the virtuosic members of Hot Pstromi, and many others.

 

The Palestinian Bid for Statehood at the UN: Breakthrough or Setback for Palestinian Nationalism and Peace?

October 3, 2011
4:15 pm
San Diego State University

Palestinian-Israeli conflict has dragged on for more than half a century.  The Oslo peace process, initiated with such high hopes in 1993, lurched to a halt, particularly in the last two years when direct Palestinian-Israeli negotiations broke off.

Now, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas is trying an entirely new approach. On September 23, 2011, he applied to the UN Security Council for Palestine to be admitted as the 194th UN member state.

The panel of scholars will discuss the pros, cons, and impact of this approach. Is it a breakthrough or a setback for peace? Will the UN Security Council approve the application? How will that change facts on the ground and on the peace process? If the Security Council rejects the application, what impact will that have on Palestinian hopes for a state and on peace efforts?

 

Music and Resistance with Yale Strom & the Hausmann Quartet

Wednesday, October 26th at 7:00 pm

Music and Resistance is the West Coast premier of Yale Strom's original composition "In The Memory Of..."

This work is based on a lost cantor's music book which Strom found in an abandoned synagogue in Carei, Romania. The majority (2,200) of this Jewish community was deported to Auschwitz in May 1944, and only 400 returned. Strom took from the cantor's book musical themes that were sung on the Sabbath and holidays and wove them into a moving tribute to the cantor and his congregants who sang these melodies -even in the ghetto- before they were forced to board the cattle cars.

This will be a unique evening of music played during some of the darkest days during the Holocaust. Sung by Jews and Roma, this is the music that uplifted their morale, gave them momentary hope and said to their Nazi aggressors that the human spirit is not so easily defeated.

The Hausmann Quartet

Since the Hausmann Quartet's formation in the summer of 2004 at LyricaFest in New Jersey, they have been acquiring a reputation as one of the great young quartets performing today. Praised for their charismatic playing and "marvelously rich tone", the quartet made their debut on the Lyrica Boston Chamber Music series and was soon named Lyrica Boston's Young Artists in Residence. The Hausmann Quartet joins San Diego State University as the 2010-2012 Joseph Fisch/Joyce Axelrod Resident String Quartet. Previously, the Hausmann Quartet were recipients of the Morrison Fellowship Award in residence with the Alexander String Quartet at the International Center for the Arts, San Francisco State University. Most recently they held a fellowship appointment at the La Jolla Music Society's 2010 SummerFest. During 2010-2012 the Hausmann quartet will have a concurrent affiliation sponsored by the La Jolla Music Society as part of the organization's ongoing commitment to community engagement and outreach.

Hot Pstromi

Hot Pstromi bandleader and founder Yale Strom is a pioneer among revivalists in conducting extensive field research in Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans among the Jewish and Rom communities. This unique research formed the foundation for Yale Strom & Hot Pstromi. Hot Pstromi's sound - a fusion of traditional klezmer, new Jewish music, Gypsy, khasidic, world beat and Balkan music noted for long improvisational breaks - is unique and celebrated.

This concert is made possible by a grant from the Doris Lipinsky Fund for the Performing Arts at SDSU and is co-sponsored by the Daniel Pearl Foundation

 

THE 24TH ANNUAL ROBERT SIEGEL MEMORIAL LECTURE AT THE SAN DIEGO JEWISH BOOK FAIR YOM LIMMUD

Sunday NOVEMBER 13th, 11:30 AM

Dr. James Kugel Author of In the Valley of the Shadow: On the Foundations of Religious Belief James Kugel shouldn't be here. More than a decade ago, the author and Starr Professor of Hebrew Literature at Harvard University was diagnosed with an aggressive, and often fatal, type of cancer. But he turned this supposed "death sentence" into an opportunity to reaffirm life… not just his own life, but your life, our lives, and filter this affirmation through the phenomenon of religious beliefs.

JAMES KUGEL was born in New York. From 1982-2003 he was Starr Professor of Hebrew Literature at Harvard University. He retired from Harvard to become Director of the Institute for the History of the Jewish Bible at Bar Ilan University in Israel, where he has also served as chairman of the Department of Bible. A specialist in the Hebrew Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls, Kugel is the author of some sixty research articles and eleven books, including The Idea of Biblical Poetry, In Potiphar's House, On Being a Jew, and The Bible As It Was (this last the winner of the Grawemeyer Prize in Religion in 2001). His books are The God of Old (Free Press, 2003), The Ladder of Jacob (Princeton, 2006), and How to Read the Bible (Free Press, 2007), awarded the National Jewish Book Award for the best book of 2007.

At the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center

 

Israel in the 21st Century

Congregation Beth Israel 7:00 PM on the following dates

Feb. 28, Al and Norman Cooper Lecture in American Jewish Politics

American-Israeli Relations since Obama and Netanyahu

Steven Spiegel UCLA,

Professor Steven L. Spiegel teaches Political Science at UCLA, serves as Director of the Center for Middle East Development at UCLA, he also provides assistance to Middle East programs at the statewide Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation of the University of California, San Diego and studies American foreign policy in the Middle East. He has authored or co-authored over 100 books, articles and papers. Professor Spiegel has also written a major international relations textbook, World Politics in a New Era. Dr. Spiegel helps produce cutting edge ideas for promoting Middle East regional security and cooperation, for this work, he received the Karpf Peace Prize in 1995, awarded to the UCLA professor for the faculty member who did the most for world peace in the previous two years.

March 7, Anti-Israeli Sentiment at American Universities Samuel Edelman, Executive Director, Scholars for Peace in the Middle East Professor Samuel Edelman is the Executive Director for Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, the co-Director or the California State Center of Excellence in Holocaust, Genocide, Human Rights and Tolerance Education. Professor Samuel Edelman has also acted as the Dean of College of Arts and Sciences at the American Jewish University in Los Angeles, is a professor of Communication Studies at CSU Chico and has also been a lecturer at Lehrhause Judaica and Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Haifa. Professor Edelman has been teaching and lecturing for 33 years, and has done has produced 5 documentaries and written extensively on anti-Semitism, Jewish rhetoric, Israeli public address, the Arab- Israeli conflict, and issues concerning genocide.


March 7, Anti-Israeli Sentiment at American Universities

Samuel Edelman, Executive Director, Scholars for Peace in the Middle East

Professor Samuel Edelman is the Executive Director for Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, the co-Director or the California State Center of Excellence in Holocaust, Genocide, Human Rights and Tolerance Education. Professor Samuel Edelman has also acted as the Dean of College of Arts and Sciences at the American Jewish University in Los Angeles, is a professor of Communication Studies at CSU Chico and has also been a lecturer at Lehrhause Judaica and Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Haifa. Professor Edelman has been teaching and lecturing for 33 years, and has done has produced 5 documentaries and written extensively on anti-Semitism, Jewish rhetoric, Israeli public address, the Arab- Israeli conflict, and issues concerning genocide.


March 14, The Shaping of the Israeli Memory of the Holocaust

Oren Meyers, Visiting Israeli Professor, SDSU, University of Haifa.

Dr. Meyers is the Lipinsky Schusterman Visiting Israeli Professor for the Jewish Studies Program at SDSU and a senior lecturer in the Department of Communication, University of Haifa. Dr. Meyers’s research interests focus on journalistic practices and values, Israeli collective memory, popular culture and the security discourse in Israeli society. Dr. Meyers' recent publications include "Memory in Journalism and the Memory of Journalism: Israeli Journalists and the Constructed Legacy of Haolam Hazeh," Journal of Communication, 2007; "The Engine's in the Front, But its Heart's in the Same Place: Advertising, Nostalgia and the Construction of Commodities as Realms of Memory," The Journal of Popular Culture, 2009; "Prime Time Commemoration: An Analysis of Television Broadcasts on Israel's Memorial Day for the Holocaust and the Heroism," Journal of Communication, 2009 (with Eyal Zandberg & Motti Neiger); "Expanding the Scope of Paradigmatic Research in Journalism Studies: The Case of Early Mainstream Israeli Journalism and Its Discontents," Journalism (forthcoming); and "Communicating Critique: Towards a Conceptualization of Journalistic Criticism," Communication, Culture and Critique.


March 21, The New Middle East: Recent Uprisings and their Impact on the Region

“The Economic Roots of the Revolutions”
Hisham Foad, Dept. of Economics, SDSU

“Why Egypt Overthrew Mubarek”
Kurt Werthmuller, Dept. of history, Azusa Pacific University

“The Israeli Media’s Response to the Revolutions”
Oren Meyers, SDSU Visiting Professor, University of Haifa

View the flyer for the March 21st event (.pdf)

 

25th Anniversary Lecture Series of the Jewish Studies Program, SDSU


March 23 “Cantata for the Victims of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire”

Yale Strom and Elizabeth Schwartz, SDSU. 7:00 PM, Rhapsody Hall, Music Building, SDSU. Introduction by Susan Cayleff, SDSU. Co-Sponsored by the Dorris Lipinsky Endowment, European, History, and Women’s Studies Departments of SDSU).

Yale Strom’s "Triangle Shirtwaist Fire" is a composition for instruments and voices to commemorate the lives of the Jewish and Italian immigrants (through music and song) who lived in the Lower East Side and tragically died on March 25th 1911 in the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. Until 9/11 the worst single calamity in terms of the number of death NYC history. The composition will include motifs from well known Yiddish and Italian folks songs and narration from diaries and letters written by these immigrants, culminating with the speech by social activist, labor organizer and socialist Rose Schneiderman gave at the memorial meeting on April 2, 1911, to an audience consisting largely of members of the Women's Trade Union League.

Yale Strom is a pioneer among klezmer revivalists and an internationally known author ethnomusicologist, filmmaker, musician, and photographer.


May 4, “Fresh Looks at the 1948 Arab-Israeli War”

Dr. Benny Morris. Ben Gurion University
Co-sponsored with Hansen Institute and Judaic Studies Program of UCSD.

7:00 PM Nasatir Hall 100, SDSU Campus

Benny Morris is a professor at Ben Gurion University teaching in the History of the Middle East department. He was a correspondent for the Jerusalem Post for 12 years. Professor Morris has authored many works including The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem (1988), The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem Revisited (2004), 1948 and After (1994), Righteous Victims (1999), Making Israel (2008), 1948: A History of the First Arab-Israeli War (2008), and One State, Two States (2009).

 

April 10-11 Western Jewish Studies Association Conference

Jewish Itineraries of Decolonization: An Archival Journey

Sarah Abrevaya Stein, UCLA.

Professor Sarah Stein teaches the Jewish, Europe, Middle East, Sephardi/Mizrahi Studies, Cultural and Comparative History. She won the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature for 2010 for her book Plumes: Ostrich Feathers, Jews, and a Lost World of Global Commerce and has authored Making Jews Modern: the Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires which was awarded the Salo Wittmayer Baron Prize for Best First Book in Jewish Studies for 2003. Professor Sarah Stein is now working on three book projects Mediterranean Fever: Classifying Jews in a Century of Decolonization, The Sephardic Studies Reader: 1730-1950, An Ottoman Rebel: Sa’adi Besalel ha-Levi, and Jewish Salonica in the Nineteenth Century.



“Cantata In Memory of the Triangle Shirt Waist Factory Fire,”
Yale Strom and Elizabeth Schwartz,
April 10, 7:00 PM Beth Israel Synagogue, Heritage Park, Old Town.

 


North County Lecture Series Featuring 2010/11 Lipinsky Schusterman Visiting Israeli Scholar Dr. Oren Meyers

San Diego State University's Jewish Studies Program is pleased to announce a special series of lectures for residents of San Diego's North County featuring Lipinsky Schusterman Visiting Israeli Professor at SDSU, Dr. Oren Meyers.

This Series is made possible by a generous grant from the Leichtag Family Foundation.

Dr. Oren Meyers is the Lipinsky Schusterman Visitng Israeli Scholar at San Diego State University and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Communication at the University of Haifa, Israel. Dr. Meyers's reserach interests focus on Israeli collective memory, popular culture and Israeli journalism. Dr. Meyers' recent publications include "Memory in Journalism and the Memory of Journalism: Israeli Journalists and the Constructed Legacy of Haolam Hazeh," Journal of Communication, 2007; "The Engine's in the Front, But its Heart's in the Same Place: Advertising, Nostalgia and the Construction of Commodities as Realms of Memory," The Journal of Popular Culture, 2009; "Prime Time Commemoration: An Analysis of Television Broadcasts on Israel's Memorial Day for the Holocaust and the Heroism," Journal of Communication, 2009 (with Eyal Zandberg & Motti Neiger). His appointment at SDSU is made possible by generous grants from the Lipinsky Visiting Israeli Fund and the Israel Scholars Fund from the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise.

The Shaping of the Israeli Memory of the Holocaust
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011
6:00pm
Encinitas Community Library

Israeli Media- Past and Present
Sunday, April 17th, 2011
1:00pm
San Diego County Library, Vista Branch

The Shaping of the Israeli Memory of the Holocaust
Wednesday, April 20th 2011
4:15 pm
California State University, San Marcos

Co-sponsored by the History Department and Phi Alpha Theta Honor Society

Professional and Personal Reflection on the Journalism of Nechemia Meyers
Wednesday, May 4th, 2011
6:00pm
San Diego County Library, San Marcos Branch

 

October 4, 7pm Preview and Panel Discussion of PBS Series: God in America

Professors Lawrence Baron, Khaleel Mohammed, and Rebecca Moore, SDSU Sponsors: The Anti-Defamation League; SDSU Jewish Studies and Religious Studies 201 Arts and Letters Building 201, SDSU

 

October 13, 3pm 25th Anniversary of Jewish Studies Program Lectures, "From Frank Sinatra to Anne Frank: the Holocaust in Hollywood Film, 1944-1959"

Professor Lawrence Baron, SDSU. 301 Geology, Mathematics, and Computer Science Building, SDSU. (Across bridge and right turn from Parking Structure on S.E. corner after I-8 Exit onto College)

View the 10/13 flyer (.doc)

 

October 17, 1pm 25th Anniversary of Jewish Studies Program at SDSU "Jews of the Pacific Coast: Reinventing Community of America's Edge"

Ava Kahn, University of California, Berkeley; Ellen Eisenberg, Willamette University Sponsors: College of Liberal Arts, Jewish Studies Program West Commons 220 , SDSU Campus (Paid Parking in Lot W).

 

October 28, 7pm Common Chords Concert: The Shared Roots of Islamic and Jewish Music

Salman Ahmad, Fred Benedetti, Samir Chatterjee, Elizabeth Schwartz, Yale Strom Sponsors: President’s Fund, Jewish Studies Program, Center for Arabic and Islamic Studies, Daniel Pearl Foundation Music Month. Smith Recital Hall, 101 Music Building, SDSU Campus. ($10 per ticket, but free for SDSU faculty and students).

 

November 7, 12pm "Burnt Books: Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav and Franz Kafka"

Rodger Kamenetz in Conversation with Gabriel Sanders Sponsored by Tablet Magazine, A New Read on Jewish Life, SDSU Jewish Studies Program, Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center, 4126 Executive Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037

 

November 17, 3pm 25th Anniversary of the SDSU Jewish Studies Program "What are Jewish Girls and Boys Made Of?: Gender in Books for Jewish Adolescents"

June Cummins-Lewis, SDSU. 301 Geology, Mathematics, and Computer Science Building, SDSU. (Across bridge and right turn from Parking Structure on S.E. corner after I-8 Exit onto College)

Where was first century Nazareth?
NEW INSIGHTS FROM ARCHAEOLOGY

A Lecture by Dr. Richard Freund
Director of the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies and Greenberg Professor of Jewish History, University of Hartford

Wednesday May 5th, 4pm
Geology, Mathematics, Computer Science (GMCS) Building, Room 314

This Lecture is free and open to the public

Dr. Richard A. Freund is Director of the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies and Greenberg Professor of Jewish History at the University of Hartford.  He has directed six archaeological projects in Israel and three projects in Europe on behalf of the University including: Bethsaida, Qumran, the Cave of Letters, Nazareth, Yavne, Har Karkom (Mount Sinai) as well as archaeological projects in Burgos and Cadiz,  Spain and at the extermination camp at Sobibor, Poland.  He  is the author of six books on archaeology and two books on Jewish ethics and over one hundred scholarly articles. and has appeared in many television documentaries, most recently the History Channel's God vs. Satan: The Final Battle,  CNN's After Jesus: The First Christians and NOVA's Ancient Refuge in the Holy Land based on his book, Secrets of the Cave of Letters. He has a Ph.D. and MA from the Jewish Theological Seminary and is an ordained rabbi.

 

 

Irène Némirovsky: Questions of Jewish Identity in France, Before and After the Holocaust

A Lecture by Dr. Susan Rubin Suleiman, C. Douglas Dillon Professor of the Civilization of France, Harvard University

Friday April 30th 10:00am
Auditorium at Aztec Athletics Center

Susan Rubin Suleiman was born in Budapest and emigrated to the U.S. as a child with her parents. She obtained her B.A. from Barnard College and her Ph.D. from Harvard University, and has been on the Harvard faculty since 1981, where she is currently the C. Douglas Dillon Professor of the Civilization of France and Professor of Comparative Literature. She served as Chair of the Department of Romance Languages & Literatures from 1997-2000 and 2003-2004, and as Head of the French section and Director of Graduate Studies in French from 2001 to 2005.

Suleiman is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on contemporary literature and culture, published in the U.S. and abroad, and has also published poetry and autobiographical works. Her books include Authoritarian Fictions: The Ideological Novel as a Literary Genre (1983); Subversive Intent: Gender, Politics, and the Avant-Garde (1990), Risking Who One Is: Encounters with Contemporary Art and Literature (1994), and the memoir Budapest Diary: In Search of the Motherbook (1996). Edited volumes include Exile and Creativity: Signposts, Travelers, Outsiders, Backward Glances (1998) and the anthology Contemporary Jewish Writing in Hungary (co-edited with Eva Forgács, 2003). Her latest book is Crises of Memory and the Second World War (Harvard University Press, 2006).

Suleiman has won many honors, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Humanities Fellowship, and several NEH Fellowships. In September 2005, she spent a month as an invited Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in Oslo, and in 2005-06 she was a Fellow of the Radcliffe Institute. In May 2006, she was named a Walter Channing Cabot Fellow by Harvard University, in recognition of her scholarly achievement. In 1990, she received the Radcliffe Medal for Distinguished Achievement, and in 1992 she was decorated by the French Government as an Officer of the Order of Academic Palms (Palmes Académiques). She served as an elected member of the Executive Council of the Modern Language Association from 1993 to 1996, and as Vice-President and President of the American Comparative Literature Association from 1995 to 1999.

This Lecture is Free and Open to the Public

This Lecture is Sponsored By: Jewish Studies Program History Department European Studies Dept. Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies-University Programs, US Holocaust Memorial Museum

 

 

Souls on Fire: Music of Golden Age Spain

Tuesday April 13th 7:00pm
Smith Recital Hall Music Bldg.
SDSU

Three cultures inhabited Spain in the 12th-15th centuries, each making an indelible impression on the region’s art and music. They lived in harmony until the expulsion of the Jews and Gypsies in 1492. Join us for a musical exploration of Spanish, Ladino & Arabic culture that will take you on a sonic journey through the passion of Flamenco, the poetry of Sephardic and the rhythm of the Moorish. A world-class ensemble-each renowned in their own right-will combine the traditional sounds from Spain’s Golden Age.

An Evening With:
Lakshmi Basile – Flamenco Dancer
Jeff Pekarek – Contrabass
Elizabeth Schwartz – Ladino/Arabic Vocals
Yale Strom – Violin
Adam Delmonte – Flamenco Guitar
Marco – Percussion
Jesus Montoya­Flamenco Vocals

General Admission: $8.00 SDSU Students, Staff & Faculty: free with id

 

Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges

A Series of Four Master Lectures February-March 2010

 

Will Israel Survive?

Dr. Mitchell Bard is the Executive Director of the nonprofit American- Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE)

Tuesday February 23rd at 3pm
Hepner Hall 221, SDSU Campus

View the 2/23 flyer (.pdf)

 

Nabucco, Israel and Babylon
The Impact of Exile on the Birth of Judaism and Christianity

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 - 7:00pm

Speakers
Dr. Nicolas Reveles, Geisel Director of Education and Outreach, San Diego Opera

Dr. Risa Levitt-Kohn, Director of the Jewish Studies Program at San Diego State University
 
Location
San Diego Natural History Museum
Charmaine & Maurice Kaplan Theater
 Balboa Park - 1788 El Prado, San Diego CA 92101

Beyond the Fiscal and Political Debate: The Moral Dimension of Health Care

Elliot Dorff
Rector Professor of Philosophy, American Jewish University
Ethics Committee. Clinton’s Health Care Task Force, 1993
California State Ethics Advisory Committee on Stem Cell Research
President, Academy for Jewish, Children, and Muslim Studies
Author, Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Medical Ethics

TIME: 4:00 PM
DATE: November 10, 2009
LOCATION: Hepner Hall, Rm. 130 San Diego State University

View 1/27/10 flyer (.pdf)

 

Please join us for a wonderful evening of music with three of the world’s leading clarinetists performing traditional and new music along with lots of inspiring improvisation.

Wednesday November 4th 2009 @ 7:00 pm
Rhapsody Hall, SDSU Music Building

Guest Artists:

Leo Chelyapov won first place in the Shostakovich Competition in Moscow at the age of twelve. In the US, he has appeared on several TV shows including Beverly Hills 90210, and Late Night with David Letterman.

Gary Gould has lectured at universities and colleges for over ten years has led a clinic called "Gary Gould and Friends: A Klezmer Experience "introducing local music pros to the art of klezmer for the Orange CountyMusicians Union Bash.

Robert Zelickman is a Lecturer of Music at UC San Diego where he has taught since 1983. He conducts the UCSD Wind Ensemble and lectures on The Symphony and Jewish Music. He is a member of Orchestra Nova San Diego and has performed with the San Diego Symphony and the San Diego Opera.

Appearing in concert with acclaimed klezmer ethnographer and Jewish Studies Artist-in-Residence Yale Strom and members of his band Hot Pstromi

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

View 11/4/09 Flyer (.pdf)

 

24TH ANNUAL ROBERT SIEGEL MEMORIAL LECTURE
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8 @ 7:30 P.M at the
Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center
4126 Executive Drive - La Jolla

Rabbi Joseph Telushkin

"A Code of Jewish Ethics Volume 2: Love Your Neighbor As Yourself"

One of the most popular speakers at book fairs in the U.S., Rabbi Telushkin, scholar, screenwriter and author of fifteen books, has completed the second of his three volume series distilling the ethical content of Jewish tradition and encouraging discussion on how to apply long-held teachings to daily life. “Love your Neighbor As Yourself” provides a much-needed guide for interpersonal relationships in these strife-torn times. As inspiring a speaker as he is an author, Telushkin truly delivers a book to live by for people of all faiths.

Book Signing Follows

 

THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT SDSU IS PROUD TO BE A CO-SPONSOR OF
THE CLOSING EVENING AUTHOR LECTURE AT THE SAN DIEGO JEWISH BOOK FAIR
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12 @ 7:30 P.M.

AMOS OZ

"Rhyming Life & Death: A Novel"

Lifelong Zionist and world-renowned Israeli author Amos Oz returns to San Diego with two new books. If you’ve never read Oz, or if you want to sample the range of his talent, The Amos Oz Reader is a great introduction with excerpts from his novels and his nonfiction centering around four themes: kibbutz, Jerusalem, the promised land, and autobiography. And if you’re an Oz fan, you’ll really enjoy his latest novel in which a prominent Israeli writer (The Author) mocks his own celebrity status while inventing erotic and hilarious lives for the people around him. This deceptively mischievous adventure involves us in the creative process and shares profound insights on literature and language, life and death.

Book Signing Follows

 

Sunday, February 22, 2009, afternoon
A Concert & Lecture by Yale Strom in conjunction with the current exhibition: "From Haven to Home: 350 Years of Jewish Life in America" FROM MINSK TO MANHATTAN: JEWISH MUSIC IN THE JEWISH IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE

New Americans Museum
2825 Dewey Rd. Suite 102 San Diego CA 92106 619 255-8908

The event will take place next door at the Command Center

 


Sunday, March 15 2009, 4:00 P.M.
A PORTABLE GOD: THE ORIGIN OF JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY
Speaker: Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn

Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn, Professor of Hebrew Bible and Judaism at San Diego State University, will explore Judaism and Christianity as sister religions and trace their lineage back to the common parent of the ancient Israelite religion. Last year Dr. Kohn was Curator of the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit. She is the chair of the Department of Judaic Studies. Her book is entitled A Portable God, and will be available for sale after the lecture. Admission is free.

At Temple Adat Shalom    
15905 Pomerado Rd. Poway, CA 92064
Phone: (858) 451-1200
Email: info@adatshalom.com

 

Wednesday, March 18, 2009, 10:30am
The Destiny of Ethiopian Jews Living in Israel

Professor Uri Ben-Eliezer, University of Haifa

Winn Room, Coronado Library
2009 Mandelbaum Family Lecture Series
presented by The Agency for Jewish Education and Coronado Friends of AJE
For more info call: (858-268-9200)

Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 7:30 P.M.
COMMON CHORDS III, THE NEXT GENERATION
At the 10th Annual Jewish Music Festival
A Celebration of Jewish and Muslim Music - Yale Strom & Salman Ahmad
At the La Jolla JCC.
View 3/18/09 Flyer (.pdf)

 


Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 10:30am
"Strangers in the Holy Land: New Immigrants in Israeli Society"

Professor Adriana Kemp, Tel Aviv University
Winn Room, Coronado Library
2009 Mandelbaum Family Lecture Series
presented by The Agency for Jewish Education and Coronado Friends of AJE
For more info call: (858-268-9200)

 


Sunday, April 12, 2009, 4:00 P.M.
HOW A JEW BECOMES BLACK IN A JEWISH LAND

The Al & Norma Cooper Lecture on Modern Jewish Politics
Speaker: Dr. Uri Ben Eliezer

Dr. Uri Ben Eliezer, Senior Lecturer in the department of Sociology, Haifa University, and Scholar in Residence at SDSU, will speak about the difficulties absorbing Ethiopian Jews in Democratic Israel. He and his wife Dr. Adrianna Kemp, have written many articles on the plight of newcomers to the State of Israel. Having lectured in several prestigious American universities, Dr. Eliezers command of English is excellent. Admission is free.

At Temple Adat Shalom
15905 Pomerado Rd. Poway, CA 92064    
Phone: (858) 451-1200
Email: info@adatshalom.com

 

Sunday, May 10th, 2009, 1:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Israel in the 21st Century: New Hopes, New Challenges

SDSU- Exercise and Nutritional Sciences Building (ENS) Room 280
(map)

DEFINETLY NOT YOUR GRANDMOTHER'S KLEZMER
BEAT BOX AND NEW JEWISH MUSIC IN THE 21ST CENTURY AND BEYOND


Josh Dolgin, aka "SoCalled" in Concert at SDSU
Canadian rapper and producer, SOCALLED is known for his eclectic mix of hip hop, klezmer and other styles. He has performed with such artists as  David Krakauer's Klezmer Madness!, rapper C-Rayz Walz, Chilly Gonzales, funk trombonist Fred Wesley, and Sophie Solomon. Josh will present a program of klezmer tunes and Yiddish songs deconstructed using electronics, a beat box and voice. This is definitely not the klezmer music of the 19th century, but of the 21st and beyond! Joining this exciting and innovative artist will be JSP Artist In Residence Yale Strom and members of his band.
Co-Sponsored by Hillel of SDSU

WED NOV. 5th, Rhapsody Hall, Music Bldg SDSU
Doors open 6:45 pm, Concert at 7:00pm
Students/Staff/Faculty with RedID: FREE
General Public $5.00 at the door
Seating is Limited

View Dolgin flyer (.pdf)

 

23RD ANNUAL ROBERT SIEGEL MEMORIAL LECTURE
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 9th at 3:30 P.M.

Aaron Cohen, Brotherhood of Warriors: Behind Enemy Lines with a Commando in One of the Worlds Most Elite Counterterrorism Units

Eighteen year-old Aaron Cohen left his privileged life in Beverly Hills to join Israel's most elite security force. After fifteen months of grueling training designed to make him a warrior, he became an expert in urban counter-terror warfare. He participated in over 200 life-or-death missions as part of a controversial "black ops" unit that abducted terrorist leaders from the Palestinian-controlled West Bank.

Cohen shares his fly-on-the-wall view of a top-secret shadowy world that redefines strength, danger and security.

Book Signing Follows
Free Admission at the San Diego Jewish Community Center

 

SDSU's Jewish Studies Program Presents: An Author Evening Lecture At the San Diego Jewish Book Fair

Tuesday November 11 at 7:30 P.M.

Daniel C. Kurtzer and Scott B. Lasensky Authors of Negotiating Arab-Israeli Peace: American Leadership in the Middle East 

Daniel Kurtzer, former US ambassador to both Israel and Egypt, and Middle East expert and widely published author and commentator Scott Lasensky share ten core lessons to guide the effort of future American peace negotiators in the Middle East. After nine months of groundbreaking consultations with dozens of statesmen, political leaders and civilians who have defined the Arab-Israeli peace process in recent years, Kurtzer and Lasensky reveal what works and what does not in this distinctive diplomatic arena.

Book Signing Follows

This Event will be held at the Lawrence Family JCC, JACOBS FAMILY CAMPUS

 

Thursday, April 10th, 2008

COMMON CHORDS Workshop & Concert
Smith Recital Hall

View 4/10/08 Flyer

This special event will feature the Pakistani rock star Salman Ahmad (guitar)of Junoon, South Asias most popular rock band, and internationally renowned Indian tabla player Samir Chatterjee in concert with acclaimed klezmer ethnographer and Jewish Studies Artist-in-Residence Yale Strom (and members of his band Hot Pstromi).  This workshop and concert celebrate the common roots of Muslim and Jewish music. Salman Ahmad formed his band Junoon (They just played at the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo.) in the early 1990's.  Since then, Junoon has become a phenomenon on the South Asian music scene and beyond. Ahmad has combined Sufi poetry, Qawaali singing and improvisation with rock music and has used his popularity to promote humanitarian efforts throughout the world. As a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations, one of his main goals is to foster mutual respect and understanding between Muslims and Jews by bringing these two groups of people together in concert settings. Through his dialogue, poetry and music, he demonstrates the many mutual "common chords" (especially music) these two ancient civilizations share. Yale Strom and Ahmad first performed together in February 2007 at Queens College in NYC as part of a large exhibit called "The Grandeur of Islamic Art in Image and Object." After the concert, they realized how effective their jamming together, a Jew and a Muslim, on stage was for the audience. They decided then to continue having these musical dialogues across the country, hoping to demonstrate and foster positive and constructive conversations between people from all walks of life.  These great artists and friends now bring this spiritual and musical energy to San Diego State. Check back soon for more details.

 

Sunday, April 13, 2008 2:00pm
The AL and Norma Cooper Lecture

Israel and Palestine: Two States for Two People
Lecturer: Dr. Liora Lukitz
This is a fascinating topic which will acquaint the audience with the current situation as well as offering insights on the possible paths that negotiations may follow. Dr. Lukitz is a Fellow at the Iraq Study Group at the Truman Institute, Hebrew University at Jerusalem. She received her doctorate at the London School of Economics and Political Science and was a research fellow at Harvard. She currently is the visiting scholar-in-residence at the Department of Judaic Studies at SDSU.
Cost: Free.
At Temple Adat Shalom    
15905 Pomerado Rd.    
Poway, CA 92064    
Phone: (858) 451-1200    
Email: info@adatshalom.com

 

Wednesday, March 12, 2008 10:30am

The Formation of Iraq: Seeds of Conflict
Liora Lukitz, Ph.D., Hebrew University
Winn Room, Coronado Library

 

Wednesday, February 13, 2008 10:30am
Mandelbaum Family Lecture Series
Presented by The Agency for Jewish Education and Coronado Friends of AJE


Sydney Taylor: "All-of-a-Kind Family" and the Jewish American Dream
Professor June Cummins, SDSU
Winn Room, Coronado Library

 

Sunday November 4, 2007 2:00pm
The 22nd Annual Robert Siegel Memorial Lecture

Risa Levitt-Kohn and Rebecca Moore discuss their new book:
A Portable God: The Origin of Judaism and Christianity at the San Diego Jewish Book Fair: Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center,
JACOBS FAMILY CAMPUS

 


Monday, November 12, 2007; 6:30 PM or 8 PM
Mystery and Mysticism at Qumran


By Esther Chazon, Ph.D., Director of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. At the San Diego Natural History Museum.

The Qumran community, the holy congregation of elect "Sons of Light," held that God revealed the deeper, hidden meaning of the Torah and Prophets to its teachers and members through a process of divinely inspired exegesis. The Qumran community's transcendent experience and intricate knowledge of the heavenly realm uncover an early link in the chain of tradition that developed into classical Jewish mysticism and Kabbalah.

Dr. Chazon serves as the Director of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. She is a lecturer at The Hebrew University in the areas of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Literature of the Second Temple Period, Development of Jewish Liturgy. She earned her Ph.D. at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her publications include, "A Liturgical Document from Qumran and Its Implications: "Words of the Luminaries" (4QDibHam)"; "Is Divrei ha-me'orot a Sectarian Prayer?" in The Dead Sea Scrolls: Forty Years of Research (Magnes Press, 1992).

Sponsored by Jewish Studies Program, San Diego State University

 


Monday December 3, 2007, 7:00pm
"Ebony and Ivory: The Interaction between Jews and African American Jazz Musicians in the first half of the 20th Century."

A lecture and musical performance with A. Spencer Barefield acclaimed jazz guitarist, composer, and producer and Jewish Studies Artist-in-Residence Yale Strom. At SDSU Music Bldg room 113.
 
This presentation will feature the music of African American and Jewish American composers and musicians exploring the rich cultural interaction of these two ethnic groups.The concert would include works by performers & composers such as Thelonius Monk, Charles Mingus, Duke Ellington, John Coltrane, George Gershwin, Benny Goodman, Stan Getz, Leonard Bernstein. Artie Shaw and others.  Discussion would explore the cultures and the origin of musical elements such as harmony, rhythm, instrumentation, in the creation of this new 20th century art form. In addition the lecture/demo will look at the social tensions related to segregation and integration between African Americans and Jews both in the music and social worlds in the first half of the 20th century.

Co sponsored by SDSU's Aficana Studies Department and the Anthropology Department. Seating is limited.


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